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Posts in Litigation and Dispute Resolution.
Image related to We're Growing in Chicago and Grand Rapids

We're excited to share that our team is growing! Ed Rice and Marina Saito have joined our intellectual property team in Chicago, while Chris Gartman, Brittni King and Tom Soehl have been added to our Grand Rapids office.

Here's a quick introduction to our newest colleagues.

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Image related to Joe Infante Named One of Grand Rapids' Business Leaders

Joe Infante has been named on Grand Rapids Business Journal’s annual “40 Under 40” list for the second time. Infante, a principal attorney in Miller Canfield’s Grand Rapids office, was selected as a business leader in Grand Rapids for his excellence in the practice of law, his outstanding reputation as one of the top craft beverage lawyers nationwide, and for the significant volunteer work he does for Hospice of Michigan, for which he serves on the Foundation Board. He is also the co-chair and founder of the Hospice of Michigan’s Barley, BBQ & Beats annual fundraiser.

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Image related to Miller Canfield’s Kimberly Scott Named a Leader in the Law

Kimberly Scott has been named in Michigan Lawyers Weekly’s Leaders in the Law Class of 2018.

Scott, a principal attorney in the firm’s Ann Arbor, Michigan, office, is known for her work in complex and “bet-the-company” litigation that present unique challenges, such as novel issues or procedure of law. For the past year, she has also become known as one of the attorneys who was named as class counsel in the widely publicized Hamama v. Adducci. Scott is working on the pro bono case with the ACLU of Michigan, representing more than 200 Iraqi nationals who had been ordered to be deported without a hearing. The case is the first in a series of recent putative class actions nationwide urging federal courts to allow time for individual immigration hearings in light of changed conditions in the immigrants’ home countries.

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Image related to The U.S. Supreme Court Puts S.E.C. Disgorgement Actions on the Clock

The U.S. Supreme Court continues to limit the timeframe in which the U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission (“S.E.C.”) can seek to levy monetary penalties in enforcement actions it brings against violators of the federal securities laws. Most recently, the Court limited to five years the window of time in which the S.E.C. can bring a claim to “disgorge,” or take away, ill-gotten gains from a defendant’s securities fraud. These rulings may result in quicker or more aggressive enforcement actions by the S.E.C. against companies or individuals accused of securities fraud, even perhaps before investigations are complete. The holdings may also affect the willingness of corporate or individual defendants to enter into “tolling agreements” with the S.E.C. that would toll (or stop) the limitations period while the parties discuss a potential resolution or settlement.

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